The perfect steak.

Food 52 has changed the way I think about cooking with their not recipes. To be honest, unless I know I’m writing something to post on Hangry Woman, I actually don’t use a recipe for most dishes I’m making at home. I cook for myself and Bryan, I know what we like, and most times I’m really familiar with what goes into a dish I want to cook – so, I just make it. That’s how I learned how to cook a really great steak.

I was afraid to make steak for the longest time. As an almost life-long Texan, I’ve never owned, or operated a grill, and the thought of making myself ill was also a deterrent from not trying it out.

I finally decided not to be afraid, and I convinced myself to do it. My first try wasn’t the best, but as I’ve tried it more, I get better with each time. I’ve experimented a few times, and every time, I get a nice, crust on the outside, and a nice rare to medium rare middle.

So, how do I make it?

First thing is first – I set out a steak until it becomes room temperature this helps to make sure your steak cooks evenly. I typically pick a ribeye because I love the marbling. It’s got fat in all of the right places and keeps the steak really flavorful without a ton of work. I rub it down with kosher salt on both sides, and crack fresh pepper over the top.

While that’s happening, I heat my griddle. I cook my steaks on very hot cast iron griddle. I turn the temperature up to medium high, and melt some butter on the middle of the griddle.

Once the griddle is heated and the steak is at room temperature (30 minutes, or so), I throw my steak on and let it cook for three minutes per side. It’s important not to move it, nudge it, or lift it while it’s cooking – you want to get that nice crisp outside, and cook evenly on both sides.

After it’s cooked, I usually poke it for temperature. I like my steaks more on the rare side, so I feel for a little bit of give when I touch it.

Then, I move it on to a cutting board and let it rest for five minutes so its juices redistribute, and we get a super tender steak.

Then, of course, I eat it, slowly, and I totally enjoy every bite.

What’s your favorite way to cook a steak? What’s a good tip for someone’s first time making one?

Recipes, travel tips & moreSubscribe for WEEKLY content!