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Chaffles: everything you need to know.

b l o g

Chaffles: everything you need to know.

A whole list of questions about chaffles answered. Read this blog to make the best chaffles.

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Chaffles are on everyone’s minds these days. Whether you’re following a keto, low carb, or low sugar lifestyle, chaffles seem unavoidable.

So far, my chaffles have been covered in Taste.Au and The Kitchn, and the chaffle train shows no signs of slowing down on the tracks.

Pumpkin pie chaffle with whipped cream and pecans on top

This creation is one of the most popular recipes on HangryWoman.com, and for good reason.

A low carb, keto-friendly, sugar-free food kind of checks all of the boxes when you’re aiming to lower your carbohydrate intake.

I’ve gotten hundreds of emails and comments about chaffles after I posted a recipe about them.

I combined every question I could to come up with this guide about them.

I’m really excited to share this because you guys have had a huge interest in what they are and how to make them.

This will be a living blog post! If there’s a question you have, but you don’t see it, be sure to let me know so I can keep adding to this and expanding everyone’s knowledge of chaffles!

So here are all of your questions about chaffles answered.

How do you pronounce chaffle?

Just like waffle, but with a “cha”! Cha-Full

What is a chaffle?

The most simple definition of a chaffle is a low-carb waffle with cheese a the base ingredient.

Rather than using flour, chaffles use cheeses like mozzarella, cheddar, and Colby jack to give the waffle its shape and texture.

They’re so popular on low-carb and keto lifestyles because they literally taste like a waffle – crunch and all.

What are the typical ingredients in a chaffle?

For a sweet chaffle, some typical ingredients you’ll find are mozzarella cheese, egg, vanilla, cinnamon, almond flour, and low carb sweeteners like swerve or allulose. I love mine with a drizzle of sugar-free salted caramel!

In savory chaffles, mozzarella can be used, but sharper, saltier cheeses like cheddar or colby jack are often mixed with ingredients like garlic powder, everything bagel seasoning, onion, Jalapenos and more.

The combinations are really endless for both sweet and savory versions.

How do you make a chaffle?

You make one by combining your chaffles ingredients in a bowl and making sure the cheese is coated well, and mixed together with the rest of your ingredients thoroughly.

Once you create the batter, you put them in a waffle maker and let them steam and crisp up.

What tools do I need to make a chaffle?

You just need a good waffle iron to make your chaffles. Measuring cups, a good bowl and a spatula are great to have too.

What does a chaffle taste like?

A chaffle tastes like a waffle! That’s the beauty of it. It’s crunchy on the outside, and soft on the inside.

The flavor combinations are pretty versatile, so you can make many variations of it.

How many carbs are in a chaffle?

This depends on a lot of factors – whether you use almond flour, or not, and what ingredients and spices you decide to add to your chaffle.

Most chaffles I’ve seen are under 5g of carbs.

How long does it take to make a chaffle?

Chaffles take anywhere from 5-15 minutes to make depending on how many you’re making, and how large you’re making them.

Are chaffles keto?

Chaffles are a keto-friendly food. They are low in carbohydrates and high in fat, so they tend to satisfy the diet’s macros.

When can I eat a chaffle?

Anytime! Chaffles make great morning breakfasts, bread replacements for lunchtime sandwiches, and a base for your dinner to go on top of!

Can I make a chaffle without cheese?

Technically no, but there are some great keto waffle recipes out there.

Can I make a dairy-free chaffle?

Again, it wouldn’t really be a chaffle without the cheese element. I haven’t tried using dairy-free cheeses for this yet, but it would be an interesting experiment for the blog.

Can I use low-fat cheeses to make my chaffle?

Yes! I have used low-fat cheeses, but just make sure to add a little oil or butter to your batter.

Low-fat cheeses melt differently and need as much help as they can get. At least with this method, you can control the fat in your cheese.

Can eating too many chaffles cause adverse effects?

Personally, and this is probably TMI, I have had a hard time pooping when I eat too many of them. I think it’s because the fiber count is low, and I’m sensitive to dairy! So, all of that to be said – it’s probably a good idea to have some fiber in your diet along with these, but everyone’s different!

Why do some recipes use almond flour?

I prefer the almond flour method for one simple reason.

Texture.

When you use almond flour it helps bind the other ingredients together so that you don’t cut into straight-up cheese and egg.

Almond flour helps texture resemble bread just a little bit more than leaving it out.

Coconut flour can be a substitute for almond flour, but note that coconut flour soaks up a lot of moisture, and it could leave your chaffle drier than you’d like.

Additionally, it could cause it to burn in your waffle maker.

Can I make chaffles without a waffle iron?

You can! Some of my readers have taken my chaffle recipe batter and made them into pancakes.

Per their experience, they really liked it. It didn’t get fluffy like a pancake, but they said it was quite tasty!

Can you make chaffles ahead?

Yes. They will keep for 7 days when frozen. Wrap them tightly in parchment paper, and stick them in a ziplock or stasher bag.

How do I reheat my chaffles?

You can reheat your chaffles by letting them thaw, and then toasting them in the toaster, or you can wrap them in a damp paper towel and microwave them for 30-60 seconds.

What are some good recipes?

The part that everyone wants to know! What are the best chaffle recipes? Here are some of my favorites!

My original recipe (sweet chaffles)
Pumpkin pie
Chocolate chip
Cheddar
Garlic parm

I really hope this leaves with some more knowledge about chaffles, and encourages you to create your own flavors.

If you try one of my recipes, be sure to let me know about it on Instagram. Don’t forget to also pin this post so others can learn about chaffles.

I always love seeing your creations and chaffles are no exception!

Thanks for reading and let me know if there are any chaffle recipes around the web that I need to add!

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9 Responses

  1. My chaffles did not get crispy. Do I need more cooking spray ? I left the second one in for longer, but it just got dry, not crispy.

    1. Hi Jean!

      They get crispy when you let them sit out outside of the waffle maker. Take them out and let them cool for a couple of minutes, and the cheese will crisp right up.

    1. I would consider them to be a bread, or waffle substitute. The possibilities are endless with the flavor combination of these.

    1. Thank you, Susan! A Belgian waffle maker will work great! It usually makes 1 big one, which ends up being 2 portions! You can always freeze half and come back to it.

  2. Is there any chance you have a recipe for chaffles without eggs? I have an egg intolerance and I’ve been researching but not finding any great chaffles without eggs. 🙁

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Mila Clarke Buckley In Kitchen

Hi! I'm Mila.

I’m a millennial woman living with LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults) after a type 2 diabetes misdiagnosis.  I love food, travel and my kitchen!

Hangry Woman is for anyone with diabetes – regardless of type.

I’m here to help you live your best life possible diabetes by showing you how to create simple, blood-sugar friendly and delicious meals

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